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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)
already about religion in taxes than foreign policy. what did the founders he talked about in your vocab to say about america's role in the world? >> guest: i think again this is a matter of great dispute. there was one major foreign policy issue in the washington administration that was the war between france and england and what they were going to do about it. even then you had two very distinctive positions. hamilton was roughly pro-british. jefferson was pro-french and this really is what led to the huge split between those two men. the national bank issue was controversial, but this is how the federalists and republicans aligned with whether they were going to favor britain or france out or could eventually produce all sorts of other things. i think the hamiltonian edition, which washington accepted as america ought to be mutual because it had no army, no navy. he didn't have money at the time. it had a strong interest in trade with england in france and just basic machiavelli and self-interest that america should remain mutual. neutrality favored the british because there is no ame
blunders on foreign policy issues. the most recent one is a failure for america to retaliate in some meaningful or symbolic way on the death of an american ambassador in benghazi. the. >> the george bush administration would have piled in there, blown things to pieces and exacted terrible retribution. that's the american way for a long time. is that the right way? would that created, however awful the incident of a death involving a death of an ambassador is, is it right that president obama says let's get this in con tex, let's not attack. wars are extremely costly, both financially and with the human loss of life. >> you just went from 0 to 60. what i'm saying is in 2000, 1999-2000. after 9/11, one of the things we learned from osama bin laden, the jihad dis and jaul kwr strongly emboldened when there was no response to the bombing of the u.s.s. cole. there was no response that demonstrated you can not do this to americans. >> what would you have done in benghazi in the aftermath. >> i'm not a general -- >> hang on. you said i went from naught to 60, what's the middle ground betwee
towards foreign policy. and he's got a long list of foreign policy challenges in the second term. iranian nukes, how to deal with china. you know, a big sort of macro agenda in the obama administration has been to reduce our footprint in the middle east, become less entangled in that part of world and pivot towards engaging with east asia. and there's been a lot of work in the first term that has strengthened ties between the u.s. and many east asia countries. and obama officials talk about that as a big project of the second term. >> well, that is the perfect segue to my next guest. christiane amanpour, i don't think there's anyone better to talk about that. thank you all very much. reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, stayin
christian conservatives, foreign-policy conservatives, and we pretty much get along on everything. i don't think there's very many things we disagree on. we discussed every issue that comes along every week we have two meetings a year african heads of 100 conservative organization. i can say they are as enthusiastic as either. the movement continues to grow. there's always new young writers coming along. authors periodicals and things that are vibrant for any movement it's going to stay alive. generally speaking given the ups and nasa politics is as good a shape as it is there have. i'm the chairman of the intercollegiate studies institute. others of you have participated there. an organization is events constantly doing a number of amazing things on college campuses across the country. has the largest list of professors associated with any organization sab association, somewhere in the 15,000 to 20,000 range. all sorts of things going on and will continue to go on. to summarize coming back to whittaker chambers, it's safe to say we chambers did as was mentioned earlier in the conference
detachment has been his foreign policy hallmark. "economy" writes that a tone of cool detachment has been his forei foreign-policy hallmark. from being the "indispensable nation, "mr. preside nation, "so how do you see the nex they are a catalyst present but t four years? not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that factor into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if y
this at all, richard, to discredit the president on foreign policy? >> i have to say that i think that benghazi is largely a function of people who suffer from obama-derangement syndrome, because i think that people who are kind of looking at the facts, does this trace to the white house, and does it trace to the president or the secretary of the state, and i h think that every bit of information that we have so far the answer to all of the questions so far is no. might they keep hammering it? of course, but at the end of the day, i don't believe we will look back in the second term and said, man, they should have gotten that benghazi behind them, because they have. >> and do you think that we will be talking about benghazi coming up? >> we, the facts and the more that the white house and the administration says this happened and by the way, that happened and not just from the partisan perspective, but coming from the state department and so forth, and with all respect, it is the senate role to ask the tough questions and the question is whether or not it is a legitimate con ver
, looking at the president's second term, this focusing on foreign policy and and domestic issues. $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreignit was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate that is as old as the republic. washington's generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world's oppressed. bit embeddedit was a place to which victims of liberty. there was no sense that we were values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case youwhy is the president having two swearing-in ceremonies? according to the inaugural committee, it has happened on six previous occasions. one today at the white house, one tomorrow at the capitol. guest: it was at the height of the war. his health was failing. they did away with most of the pomp, and had the ceremony on the grounds of the
agenda now. and in foreign policy, very often, the actions you have taken, the consequences are now clear whether good or bad. and you either have to make a corrective course for some of the bad consequences or try to solidify some of the gains that you've made. and because you really don't have four years now. it will start to slip away very quickly. you've got to set some priorities, because the president's time, the secretary of state's time, secretary of defense's time is pretty limited. you better know what you want to achieve in in in three years or so >> you told me earlier this morning something i had never known. upper the national security adviser, one of the president's closest aides during the first term. then you were nominated to be secretary of state, and you told me you had to go through a full background check. >> that's right. i remember thinking-- they were going out and talking to my neighbors again. and i remember thinking didn't we just do this four years ago? you know what i've been doing for the last four years. maybe it's a little bit of a sense of the turf wars i
obligations under control and set us on a new fiscal course. >> the president's first foreign-policy priority last term was israeli-palestinian peace. it's unlikely to take the top spot the second time, where most expect the president's focus to be on iran. >> it's hard to believe if we can't get a meaningful negotiation within the next two years that you will not have it read capable of producing a nuclear weapons. then, the u.s. has the choice in its negotiations -- will the solution be containment or is it going to be a preventive strike? >> as he takes the oath again, he will do it with the experience of that presidencies are often formed by crises that happened outside of their control. he will know all folksy brought here last i did not change washington. he will try something -- you have to try something new if you want to accomplish his ambitious agenda this type. >> there are reports that algeria special forces have captured five of the kidnappers involved in the past plant incident. they are looking at the side recovering bodies. >> half how many of the hostages seen in the -- how m
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
. >> reporter: a number of presidents in their second terms have focused heavily on foreign policy and now that mr. obama has begun the job of replacing his outgoing secretaries of state and defense and the director of the cia, he'll have new faces to work with on his foreign policy team. joe johns, cnn, washington. >>> well, most people who come to washington for president obama's second inauguration are happy just to be able to witness history. >>> but some visitors want a little bit more, like monogrammed pillow cases and a 24-hour butler. who wouldn't want that? you can get it all for a price. we'll tell you about it when we come back. d. earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas. no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy the most. [ woman ] it's as easy as... one! -two. -[ all ] three! [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell
on foreign policy and and domestic issues. the obama doctrine calls for ending america's wars, avoiding future ones and nationbuilding here at home. good ideas all. but, mishandled, they could signal a retreat from washington's global leadership. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations the united states had, compare that with today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington's generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed
foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're considering you as a possibility for secretary of state? >> she didn't believe it. >> fell leap is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day, after hearing it from two reporters and i'm pretty sure her rely was something along the lines of not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant why not just say no? >> i think she did, or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton, secretary of state designate. >> clinton was quickly confirmed but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been surprised. >> surprised that while secretary clinton and president obama have been separated often as she
will say about foreign policy. we are at a point this and i am worried personally about the next four years but i am curious how much, both that he ended the war in iraq and the war is receding or does he say american is signals something other than thorough retreat from the world which is how it looks. >>bret: we have the address tomorrow, but the state of the union in a couple of weeks away, what is the biggest challenge? >> we are in a real threat to our security at home and overseas but we are in a fiscal crisis. we are at odds, we have a president and a republican party not speaking to each other, we are headed, again, to the edge of the default. we have to come up with a solution to that. americans are weary of the aspirational calls for unity they hear from president at state of the union addresses and inaugural addresses but everyone is paying holiday bills worried their taxes could go up. they know that congress is broken. they know the congress is paralyzed. they know president obama was complicity in that. the republicans made a plan do go after him, but he is complicity that the
should be our foreign policy, keeping gadhafi empower, is that four or in opposition to american interests? i don't get them as issues' notebook. those are policy issues. i'm mainly concerned with regime issues. but you take your point, i am making a distinction between the democratic sovereignty and so i guess they don't have an objection to the overthrow of the burmese government. it would have an objection is a policy, i don't think to be a good policy to change every country in the world i am not advocating not in any sense. we can argue about different policies. i'm saying is a form of government, the liberal democratic nationstate is superior to other forms of government. one would be global governance. others isn't autocratic regime. i talk about russia and china has autocratic regimes than i do see any problem pushiness countries in a democratic direction, not by force, the public affairs and so on would be an acceptable policy. we could do it or not do it is a policy decision. of course there is radical islam, which establishes sharia as the constitutional structure and
's more into foreign policy. >> eleanor, i'm curious how much you think approval ratings matter in a second term. you are not running for office again, but let's face it, popularity will also potentially equate with political capital. >> well, that's right. popularity equates with how much you can get done on capitol hill. i heard you say that bill clinton was one of two president who is rose in popularity second term nap's despite he was impeached. >> small detail. >> he was able to cash in on that because he pitted the american people against the congress. that's the opening this president has. i'm heartened by the fact they'll take organizing for america and make it organizing advocacy. i don't know why they didn't do that in the first term. i'm pretty optimistic about what he can get done. we've seen transformation in american society with the acceptance of gay marriage, transformation in the media. there could be transformations on capitol hill. if the president isn't able to accomplish, for example, his gun control agenda, who's going to look bad on that? that could have r
to the conservative view point whether it be on foreign policy and anti-communism, economic conservativism or limited government, constitutionalism or what today is called social conservativism, more likely then it would be called traditional conservativism. the issues were a little different and less clear back then. but there's always been social conservativism. rusher had a very important ally, a man named frank meyer. meyer remains sufficiently respected and known among at least an older generation of conservatives that there is a frank meyer society here in washington which i'm going to be a little, a group of conservative leaders who keep his memory alive. they're going to be meeting on monday night, and i'm going to be speaking to them. meyer has been tribed by rusher as -- described by rusher as the intellectual engine of the conservative movement. he, too, was an ex-communist, as burnham was. but meyer was a conservative activist. a passionate conservative activist. rusher even told me that meyer had once been a militant communist. i, rusher, had been a militant republican. quote: they're no
if there is a legacy on foreign policy other than the important moment of taking on -- >> it lets us take note in a way of the way the first family has lived their life in the white house, one thing that you noted is that the obamas like to go out to restaurants and eat out as opposed to the bushes who entertained inside the white house. how does that change the washington scene, do you think? >> i think there's almost been less of that, too. as time went on, there was a newness when they moved into their new city and their new community and they wanted to get out and about and be seen as members of our community family here in washington. but the reality is, it does get very hard to make the movements outside of the white house to disrupt the flow of traffic. although, it is an exciting moment, you know, from time to time when they are able to do that. so, i think, you know, the way you live your life before you came here is the way you try to live your life when you are here. >> you worked very closely with laura bush. >> i did. >> i'm just curious, this is the president's day and the vice president'
the president views this -- he is really -- he sees himself as the protector in chief and that's true on foreign policy and it's true on domestic -- >> he clearly seems to have been personally affected, matthew dowd, by the newtown tragedy, but how much -- if you were advising him, how much should he invest in this at the beginning of what is a packed second term? >> he definitely was affected by it. every american was affected by what happened in that awful situation. i mean the president could have done a lot of this in the last four years which he chose not to do. he could have done a bunch on executive orders and decisions he chose not to because he understood the political problem with this. to me this whole issue -- i live in austin, texas, and texas is a place where people love their guns. i have five -- owned five guns. most people know something has to be done. most people know there has to be something done. how far does it is extended is a question of debate. something will get passed -- but i'm just -- >> before that, my fear is the real thing that won't get done is what the real iss
bit about foreign policy and maybe a tiny bit about 2016. oh! progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. >>> we are back with former senator russ feingold, former house speaker newt gingrich and the stellar susan page and ron brownstein. thank you all for being here. i want to play you -- this is a couple of bits of the president talking about al qaeda and terrorism. >> al qaeda is on the path to defeat. war in afghanistan is winding down. al qaeda has been decimated. al qaeda's on the run and bin laden is dead. >> so my question out of this is algeria. northern africa has now, for a long time, we heard about yemen and somalia, places like that, but now hearing about algeria, mali. what -- it seems like it has become or been allowed to become a very dangerous place. >> this is something i worked on
but decided to make a bold foreign policy statement. what are the considerations that go into choosing what you say. >> when you look at the history of inaugural addresses there are some determined by the trajectory of history. john f. kennedy gave a speech that codified the moral commitments of the cold war. ronald reagan's first inaugural speech was an economic speech. the context was inflation which was a threat to the country at that time. but most of others, bush was like that too, most of the other good ones, jefferson's first or whatever, they're really about the values that unite the country and then also try to put your moment in the broad long context of american history. why this is important and how we're led forward. without being a policy address, it says we have certain values that mean we have to confront certain problems. if i was working on this speech, which i'm not, i would address this problem of polarization, the deep divisions of our country, how we get passed that, achieve common purposes in this country and the president would benefit even in the partisan debates lo
at the president pulls a second term, this focusing on foreign policy and thand domestic issues. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations united compare that with, today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington post generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world also oppressed. -- world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed earlier. why is the president having two swearing-in ceremonies? according to the inaugural committee, it has happened on six previous occasion
, the pivot eastward, if you will, when it comes to foreign policy. the pentagon is sounding the alarm over north korea's movement of some powerful missile launchers. what does this mean for stability in the renal as we look ahead? why some believe this may be a precursor to war. >>> also, the president as we just reported to you is officially sworn in for a second term in office. the big celebration is tomorrow. ahead, we'll look at inaugurations throughout our history. we'll be back with more happening now. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums a. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it again -- watch me. just like that one... [ male announcer ] the durability of the volkswagen passat. pa down something he will be grateful for. good arm. that's the power
the president issued a memorandum instructing more engagement in foreign policy around lgbt people. this is having humongous impact. >> humongous impact. >> all over the world and real life saving important things. we need that engagement to continue. >> yeah. >> we need all the work that's going on around health care, which is so important to all americans. you know, the medicaid expansion thing that we talk about a lot in terms of other populations for transgender people it is hugely important. so many of us have been impover shed. >> many americans aren't aware of it. they understand we have a set of protections on if you are a woman, a set of protections on your religion. i don't think many people realize in this country, if you are a transgender woman or a transgender man or gay or lesbian, you can lose your job in many states in this country. >> there's been legislation on it since 1974. it's been discussed in congress. we do not have this. it's something the president can put his weight behind and push for as well. there's something else i want to mention. california passed
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)